Derisking Sustainable Electrification of Health Facilities

Event
Date
09:00 CAT
14 Mar 2024
End
15:00 CAT
14 Mar 2024
Location
Kigali, Rwanda

Kindly note that this is a closed event (i.e., By Invitation Only), limited to a number of 30 participants, (donors and development partners)
 

Background 

Providing high-quality health care is virtually impossible without access to reliable electricity in health facilities. And yet, close to one billion people globally are served by health-care facilities with no electricity access or with unreliable electricity. Per a recently published report led by WHO, World Bank/ESMAP, SEforALL, and IRENA, 12% and 15% of health facilities in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, respectively, have absolutely no access to electricity. The huge energy access gap in health facilities calls for increased investments: an estimated 5 billion USD is needed to reliably electrify health facilities in most developing countries in these two regions, complemented by business models to deliver sustainable solutions. 

Support from donors is critical to bridge the gap in financing. Off-grid solar presents a key opportunity to provide clean, reliable, quickly dispatchable, and cost-effective electricity to health institutions that wouldn’t otherwise have access. But ensuring that these solutions can provide electricity on a long-term, sustainable basis comes with challenges. If donors continue to support health facilities with grants to cover the up-front costs, government agencies may not have the incentive to promote an operational model that encourages sustainability. The focus should be on how health infrastructure and programs can be sustainable, improve
health outcomes, and adapt to a changing energy and climate landscape. Energy companies that are best suited to carry ongoing energy services (Energy-as-a-Service model, EaaS) struggle to serve public facilities due to repayment risks and other challenges.  Donor/government funding needs to thus incentivize private sector solutions, such as EaaS models to improve the system sustainability of health electrification programs. Donor programs should be structured to promote long-term sustainability and fill funding gaps to achieve that goal. Refer to the publication on this topic for more information. The publication refers to new models for making health facility electrification more sustainable (e.g. EaaS). However, it makes the case for private sector investments/participation to be derisked with the help of donors for these models to be workable.

Objective

This discussion with donors, DFIs, investors and other important partners on the margins of the TEA forum is intended to: 

  • Present and discuss some sample energy-as-a service initiatives, highlighting the
    similarities and differences
  • Discuss the risks facing EaaS models and opportunities for mechanisms to derisk them
  • Highlight emerging de-risking initiatives/instruments (for the purposes of attracting donor support and for securing government and private sector buy in)
  • Provide a platform for donors and development partners to offer suggestions on designing and deploying derisking measures 
  • Announce a call to action for donors and development partners to offer strategic and financial support to derisking instruments presented at the meeting and beyond

Moderator: SEforALL

 

Agenda

 Time TopicSpeaking Participants
5 minOpening RemarksTEA
10 minObjectives and Run-of-PlaySEforALL
15 minCurrent state of the Powering Healthcare sector and the need for sustainable
business models
SEforALL
30 minA brief overview of existing and planned initiatives that have variations of the
Energy as A Service Model and the potential for derisking instruments
 
Identified partners
1.5 hourPresentation of potential derisking mechanisms. For instance,
• SEforALL pilot derisking instrument for Kenya and India
• Role of the Italy-UNDP Energy Partnership in unlocking finance
• WBG derisking instrument for electrifying public institutions
Identified Partners
1 hourLunch 
1.5 hourModerated discussion: This will focus on common risks observed across different EaaS models, common themes across derisking mechanisms, what is missing in them, and how can the sector work together to instill confidence in the private sector. Break-out groups may be consideredAll participants
30 minCall to Action for Collective Sectoral Action as well as Provide Strategic and
Financial Support for Derisking
SEforALL


 

Country

Rwanda

Partner

UKAID TEA

Examining the potential for electric cooking in Rwanda

News

Cooking with firewood is harmful to peoples’ health and the environment, which is why the global push for clean cooking seeks to help people transition to less polluting cooking solutions.

According to the IEA, Rwanda ranks among the top 20 countries worldwide with the lowest percentage of the population with access to clean fuels and technologies. Approximately 93 percent of Rwandan households use biomass for cooking in the form of firewood (76 percent) and charcoal (17 percent), according to the 2022 Population and Housing Census of Rwanda.

A study developed by Sustainable Energy for All and its partners examined the potential for electric pressure cookers (EPCs) to replace these traditional, polluting cooking methods in Rwanda and inform government and industry efforts to promote the technology’s adoption.

The electric cooking (eCooking) study was a joint initiative between Nexleaf Analytics, Modern Energy Cooking Services, Electrocook, A2EI and Climate Solutions Consulting, with support from Swedish Postcode Foundation. It involved Electrocook providing 100 participants with EPCs  as a replacement for the charcoal and/or LPG stoves they were previously using. Their experiences with the EPCs were tracked to assess several factors, including overall usage, cooking costs, time savings, changes to cooking habits, and more.

Key findings of the study are summarized in a report titled Examining the Experience of Using Electric Pressure Cookers in Urban Households in Kigali, Rwanda and show that the overall experience of cooking with an EPC, which was a new cooking appliance to nearly all participating households, was positive.

The study shows that transitioning to eCooking offers numerous advantages both within households and on a wider scale. Study participants appreciated the cleaner and more convenient cooking experience offered by the EPC, both in terms of the fuel preparation and the cooking process itself. For example, the median time taken to prepare a meal decreased from one hour 44 minutes in the baseline phase to one hour 30 minutes in the pilot phase, resulting in a time saving of nearly 15 minutes.For some food like vegetables, about 30 minutes can be saved and savings for cooking beans are even greater.

clean-cooking-Rwanda

However, the study also revealed several key barriers to consumer uptake of EPCs. For example, participants commonly resorted to fuel stacking (using an additional cooking method), indicating the challenge of cooking multiple dishes in an EPC, especially given that only one pot was provided with the appliance. This finding emphasizes the need for a cooking appliance that can accommodate multiple dishes simultaneously and include multiple pots (whether as an extra item paid for upfront or in instalments, or as part of a set).

These types of insights are meant to guide the efforts of industry and government to support a transition to clean cooking. Additionally, the report highlights that it is crucial to overcome potential barriers to people buying and using appliances. These include the cost, the current lack of training and familiarity with how to use eCooking appliances, user-centric design considerations, shared household electricity meters, and lack of awareness on cost competitiveness of cooking with electricity as part of a cooking mix. By addressing these factors, households can be encouraged to move away from biomass and transition towards cleaner and more sustainable fuel alternatives.

Up until recently, cooking with electricity was not viewed as a viable clean cooking alternative in Rwanda and other low-middle income countries due to the relatively high cost and inefficiency of electric cooking appliances, low levels of electricity access, and high cost of electricity where connections are available. However, with the emergence of energy-efficient appliances such as EPCs and the increasing availability and improved reliability of electricity, particularly in urban centres, electric cooking has become an option for greater numbers of people.

Study findings were presented during a workshop in Kigali on 8 November involving representatives from the Rwandan government, development partners, researchers and local clean cooking companies. The EPC pilot dataset is integral to the electric cooking model in the Integrated Clean Cooking Planning Tool that is being used to develop the Rwanda National Integrated Clean Cooking Plan, which will be publicly accessible by all stakeholders within the clean cooking sector. This strategic initiative will, in turn, facilitate informed decision-making for both government agencies and private sector actors.

Country

Rwanda

Programme

Clean Cooking

Examining the Experience of Using Electric Pressure Cookers in Urban Households in Kigali, Rwanda 

Research
clean-cooking-Rwanda

Up until recently, cooking with electricity was not viewed as a viable clean cooking alternative in Rwanda and other low-middle income countries (LMICs) due to the relatively high cost and inefficiency of electric cooking appliances, low levels of electricity access, and high cost of electricity where connections are available. However, with the emergence of energy-efficient appliances such as electric pressure cookers (EPCs) and the increasing availability and improved reliability of electricity, particularly in urban centres, electric cooking has become an option for greater numbers of people. 

This report presents the findings of a study on the experience of urban households in Kigali using EPCs and the impact of those on stove(s) and fuel(s) usage, fuel stacking, cooking expenditure, time savings and cooking habits, including any changes in the types of dishes cooked. The results show that the overall experience of cooking with an EPC, which was a new cooking appliance to nearly all participating households, was positive. 

With the pressing risks associated with climate change and deforestation, reducing reliance on biomass has become one of the top challenges the Government of Rwanda is looking to address over the coming decade. By highlighting the benefits of cooking with electricity, and the compatibility of cooking with energy-efficient cooking appliances, this study aims to inform the possible pathways for clean cooking transitions in Rwanda. 

Country

Rwanda

Programme

Clean Cooking

New analysis details how Rwanda can electrify every healthcare facility across the country

News

Rwanda could achieve 100 percent electrification of its healthcare facilities by 2027 by using solar power and backup batteries to electrify currently unelectrified health posts, according to the latest report Powering Healthcare in Rwanda: Market Assessment and Roadmap for Healthcare Facilities by SEforALL in consultation with EnGreen. 

Developed with support from Power Africa, this report aims to provide the government and its development partners with data on the scale of the remaining energy gap in the healthcare sector, and options of long-term sustainable models and estimates of investment needed for delivery of continuous and reliable electricity service. 

Of the 2,139 health facilities in the country, 85 percent (1,813) are connected to the grid. This figure includes all the secondary and tertiary health centres - all of which have a battery backup - and 74 percent of the health posts. A third of the remaining health posts is already powered by standalone solar PV systems, leaving a total of 229 health posts without access to a reliable and renewable electricity source.  

This creates a market opportunity to connect these health posts to solar PV systems, phase out diesel generators, as well as provide better battery backup for the other health facilities. USD 10 million would be needed to achieve these outcomes, as defined in the report’s “roadmap” – USD 1.5 million for standalone PV systems in off-grid health posts and USD 8.5 million for battery backup in grid-connected health facilities. 

“Rwanda’s government has made remarkable progress in ensuring health facility electrification is, and remains, a priority, and new and innovative financing mechanisms are now needed to sustain this development,” said Luc Severi, who manages the Powering Healthcare programme at SEforALL. “This roadmap also provides valuable insights into how we can bring life-saving power solutions to the remaining unelectrified health facilities in Rwanda.” 

Historically, international donors have been funding off-grid pilot projects, but moving forward, leveraging private investments can help close the financing gap. Scaling up projects, innovative financing and other mechanisms like public-private partnerships, compensation and subsidies are necessary to attract such investments. 

The report covers various such aspects of healthcare facility electrification in Rwanda and finally draws out four key challenges to address, along with recommendations, for the country to achieve its health facility electrification goals: 

  1. Ensuring continued effective internal and external coordination between all key stakeholders including the various government ministries and donors.  
  2. Creating an enabling environment for private sector engagement through mechanisms like public-private partnership (PPP), compensation, subsidies and other de-risking instruments.  
  3. Ensuring access to reliable data about the sector. 
  4. Allocating adequate resources for operation, maintenance and training to ensure reliability and security of the electricity supply and enable high-level healthcare services. 

Rwanda’s governmental expenditure on healthcare as a share of its overall expenditure is above the average spending of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Given this level of commitment and its ambition to achieve 100 percent electrification by 2024, and supported by the right kind of investment, Rwanda can become a trailblazer in fully powering its healthcare facilities with clean and reliable electricity, positively impacting millions of lives. 

Musabyimana Nadine works as a nurse at the Nyamisa health post in the village Mubuga in Rwanda. The health post had no access to electricity until it was recently solarised, and it now has electricity around the clock. 

“The clinic would become dysfunctional after dark, but we cannot control when a woman goes into labour,” says Musabyimana. “We used to deliver babies with great difficulty using phone torches and run lab tests without light. Many thanks to solar, we don’t have to do that anymore.”  

More electrification projects like the one in Mubuga are needed, and this new study seeks to guide similar efforts. The research includes contributions from key stakeholders like Rwanda's Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Infrastructure (MININFRA), Rwanda Energy Group Limited (REG) and its two subsidiaries, the Energy Utility Corporation Limited (EUCL) and Energy Development Corporation Limited (EDCL), UNDP and other organisations working on powering social infrastructure in Rwanda. 

Country

Rwanda

Powering Healthcare in Rwanda: Market Assessment and Roadmap for Healthcare Facilities

Developed with support from Power Africa, this report aims to provide the government and its development partners with data on the scale of the remaining energy gap in the healthcare sector, and options of long-term sustainable models and estimates of investment needed for delivery of continuous and reliable electricity service. 

Of the 2,139 health facilities in the country, 85 percent (1,813) are connected to the grid. This figure includes all the secondary and tertiary health centres - all of which have a battery backup - and 74 percent of the health posts. A third of the remaining health posts is already powered by standalone solar PV systems, leaving a total of 229 health posts without access to a reliable and renewable electricity source.  

This creates a market opportunity to connect these health posts to solar PV systems, phase out diesel generators, as well as provide better battery backup for the other health facilities. USD 10 million would be needed to achieve these outcomes, as defined in the report’s “roadmap” – USD 1.5 million for standalone PV systems in off-grid health posts and USD 8.5 million for battery backup in grid-connected health facilities.

Country

Rwanda

Chilling Prospects 2022: The role of National Cooling Action Plans in delivering the global environment agenda

Data analysis
Chilling Prospects 2022

Reflections on five years of the Kigali Amendment by the Cool Coalition

See all Cooling for All partner stories

Explore the full report


Increasing temperatures, growing economies, and more frequent heat waves and extreme weather events across the globe are resulting in a growing demand for cooling services.  

In recent years, the issue of promoting sustainable and affordable access to cooling has emerged as an area of focus for governments, the health and food industry, real estate and technology providers, and financial institutions. Cooling services are essential to provide human comfort and productivity and ensure the safety of foods, medicine and vaccines, but can have negative environmental and economic impacts. Cooling is currently responsible for more than 7 percent of GHG emissions, and this figure is projected to double by 2050 if left unmanaged. Given the adverse impact of cooling on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, accelerated global efforts on policy, technology and finance availability for sustainable cooling have now become inevitable. Climate-friendly cooling could cut 8 years’ worth of global emissions by 2050.

Current global status 

Since the inception of the Kigali Amendment, the need for holistic and synergistic actions on achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and Kigali Amendment targets has been witnessed globally. National Cooling Action Plans (NCAPs), a global policy best practice, have gained prominence among countries beginning to develop long-term policy strategies. Starting in 2018 several countries opted to develop an NCAP with technical support from specialized agencies and address the cross-cutting nature of cooling, to bring stakeholders from government, industry and academia to the table, discuss needs and possible solutions, and translate this into a document that would provide a roadmap for action. 

To accelerate global efforts, in 2020 the Cool Coalition brought together several of these NCAP pioneers and members and developed a guiding framework and holistic but modular methodology for the development of NCAPs that cover cooling comprehensively, including various sectors and end uses, and both met and unmet cooling needs. Currently, over 30 NCAPs are at various stages of development. Several countries, including Cambodia, Indonesia and Pakistan, are piloting the Cool Coalition methodology to develop their plans, and others have leveraged the methodology to strengthen their ongoing work.   

Cool Coalition together with its partners organized a series of workshops between June and September 2021 to launch the NCAP Methodology, capture experiences and lessons learned from leading countries, and build capacity among national policymakers and stakeholders on developing and implementing NCAPs in various regions of the world. Some examples are:  

India: The India Cooling Action Plan (ICAP) was among the first NCAPs launched in March 2019, developed by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC). The ICAP presents a 20-year outlook on how cooling demand in India will evolve in priority-demand sectors, and outlines strategies and actions that promote sustainable and smart cooling practices across the nation while mitigating adverse impacts. This landmark policy document demonstrates unprecedented inter-ministerial and cross-sectoral collaboration in identifying ambitious goals and laying out actionable pathways.

The government has established an implementation framework through inter-ministerial and cross-sectoral working groups by aligning the plan with sectoral priorities and existing policy frameworks. Multilateral development organizations and financial institutions are increasingly viewing cooling through the ICAP as an investment opportunity, and the World Bank Group has conducted a study to operationalize the implementation of the ICAP through multilateral investments. 

Panama: Unlike most NCAPs, Panama’s NCAP falls under the Ministry of Health. The Panama Cooling Plan (PCP) was developed by three key government entities on cooling: the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Environment and the National Secretariat of Energy and was supported by the UNDP. The PCP emphasizes the sustainability of the transition process and the importance of the participation of the private sector and the general public, and places special emphasis on women and the needs of the most vulnerable. The plan is helping the government to align policies and programmes, identify synergies related to climate change, environment and health, and transition to climate-friendly refrigerants.  

Rwanda: Rwanda was a pioneer in the development of its NCAP four years ago and now has ambitious cooling targets to reduce GHG emissions to 38 percent, rigorous energy-efficiency regulations and, together with the UK government, is developing the Africa Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Cooling and Cold-Chain (ACES). Its main objective is to address the complex and cross-cutting nature of climate-friendly cooling and incorporate the agriculture, health, industry, and building and construction sectors, both public and private. The NCAP serves as a call to sustained action with strategies that can be built upon over time. It is continuously strengthened and has a built-in ecosystem of multi-sector collaboration. Rwanda has a long-term vision to expand and collaborate regionally and internationally and is developing funding schemes to create access to sustainable cooling solutions and products.  

Cambodia: The Government of Cambodia through the Ministry of Environment’s National Ozone Unit and its Department on Climate Change, and in collaboration with six other ministries, has prepared a comprehensive NCAP in partnership with the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Cool Coalition and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). It has included comprehensive cooling measures in its updated NDC and is now working towards the integration of passive cooling into its green building guidelines.

The aim of the NCAP is to build upon the existing work on the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) phaseout and forthcoming Kigali Amendment implementation plans to integrate energy-efficiency and demand-reduction measures and in doing so accelerate refrigerant transition and maximize GHG emission reduction benefits. The development of the NCAP has helped the Government of Cambodia unify information on multiple cooling sectors, analyze potential economic, energy and GHG savings and identify pathways to integrate comprehensive action to address its current and future cooling demands. 

Way forward and call for action 

NCAPs have been recognized by countries, partners, the Technical and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) and the UN alike as key to linking efficiency and the refrigerant transition and maximizing climate benefits.  

NCAPs are an important first step to establish frameworks and catalyze integrated and comprehensive action on cooling and cold chains. They can be used as a long-term strategy to achieve NDC targets and develop and deploy Kigali Amendment implementation plans. NCAPs have also helped countries attract finance for implementation.   

However, the development of NCAPs requires resources. To date, these resources have been largely provided by the Clean Cooling Collaborative (formerly the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program (K-CEP)). Green Climate Funds (GCF) has indicated that countries can request its readiness funds to develop NCAPs, and several other development banks have also signalled their interest in supporting countries.

The Cool Coalition finance working group will also explore opportunities to support member countries who express an interest in developing NCAPs. However, given the importance of NCAPs in accelerating the refrigerant transition, it is hoped that funds could also be made available under the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol (MLF).  

Meet our Global Panel on Access to Cooling member from the Cool Coalition

Chilling Prospects

Chilling Prospects 2022

Sustainable cooling policy progress

Highlights from the 2022 SEforALL Forum in Kigali

News

Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) and the Government of Rwanda welcomed more than 1,300 people from around the world to the global SEforALL Forum in Kigali from 17-19 May. The much-anticipated, landmark event for sustainable energy had to be postponed twice due to Covid-19, but the wait proved to be worth it.

In addition to being held in-person, the entire Forum was streamed online for those unable to attend in Kigali, and around 2,800 tuned in to watch.

For all those attending and watching, the Forum aimed to reinforce the fact that achieving global energy, climate and development goals must happen in tandem to achieve a just and equitable energy transition.

The three days were filled with inspiring talks, bold commitments and transformative actions that have the potential to deliver accelerated progress towards clean, affordable energy for all by 2030 and net zero by mid-century.

Here are just a few highlights from the 2022 SEforALL Forum.

Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame opens the Forum

kagame

It was an honour to host His Excellency Paul Kagame, President of the Republic of Rwanda, at the opening ceremony of the Forum on 17 May.

In line with the Forum’s theme of “Driving Bold Action for a People-Centred Energy Transition,” President Kagame emphasized the need for a just and equitable energy transition.

“By integrating sustainable energy in pandemic recovery plans, we can accelerate the transition to clean power,” President Kagame said. “But the transition must be just and equitable. This means it should align with Africa’s development priorities and aspirations to ensure no one is left behind. At the same time, there needs to be increased financing to developing countries to support climate adaptation, in line with international agreements. Africa cannot carry the burden alone, especially given that its emissions did not create the climate emergency.”

Ministerial Roundtables

ministerial meeting

Two Ministerial Roundtables were held during the Forum, one for Africa and another for the Asia-Pacific region.

The goal of the Africa Ministerial was to take initial steps in defining their requirements for a just and equitable energy transition in Africa, starting a discussion that can be carried forward into COP27 this fall in Egypt.

Ministers and high-level representatives from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Uganda, and Zimbabwe participated in the roundtable, along with a select group of observers.

After rigorous discussion, the countries agreed on seven transformative actions towards achieving Sustainable Development Goal 7 in Africa, outlining them in the Kigali Communique.

Meanwhile, the Asia-Pacific Roundtable included representatives from Bangladesh, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, who focused their discussion on what’s needed to scale up finance for the energy transition in the region. It was an opportunity for countries to convey their needs to several major financial institutions who were also in attendance, and to set a course for collaboration with them.

USD 347 million in commitments made

One of the main objectives of the Forum was to spur investment in clean energy access, efficiency and transition.

Energy finance was a focus of the Ministerial discussions and several sessions throughout the three days. Financial innovations like results-based financing were highlighted as promising solutions for the off-grid sector to bring life-changing energy to rural communities.

But the Forum also offered a platform for new financial commitments to be announced. Approximately USD 347 million of new funding was announced, which included the following:

  • Bloomberg Philanthropies committed USD 242 million to accelerate the clean energy transition in 10 developing countries, including Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, and South Africa, through partnerships with SEforALL, the ClimateWorks Foundation, and other key partners to expand renewable energy capacity and access while phasing out coal use.
  • Global Energy Alliance for People and Planet (GEAPP) committed USD 50 million to further its multi-year support for SEforALL to support scale-up of the Universal Energy Facility, the results-based financing facility managed by SEforALL, and to also support countries’ energy access and transition plans.
  • IKEA Foundation announced USD 5.8 million in funding also to support the scale-up of  the Universal Energy Facility.
  • Innovate UK’s Energy Catalyst announced that up to GBP 40 million will be issued to help combat the climate crisis for communities in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Indo-Pacific regions.

Launch of new SEforALL research and initiatives

panel discussion

For SEforALL, the Forum provided a showcase for new and emerging bodies of work.

We launched the latest Chilling Prospects research report that identified 1 in 7 people globally are at high risk due to lack of access to cooling and numbers will continue to rise by 2030 without action to achieve universal electrification and end extreme poverty.

The brand-new Sustainable Energy for All Knowledge Hub was on display at the Forum marketplace. This interactive platform provides sustainable energy policy makers and practitioners with off-the-shelf guidelines, tools, templates and cases studies on energy policy and regulation published by international organizations and thought leaders.

Mission Efficiency was unveiled as a collective of commitments and actions on energy efficiency made by governments, organizations and other initiatives. SEforALL and partners of the former Three Percent Club on Energy Efficiency will be developing Mission Efficiency in the coming months.

A space for youth voices

sdg7

The level of youth engagement at the Forum was truly remarkable. With approximately 300 youth delegates attending in Kigali, it’s clear this group wants an active role in shaping the energy transition.

We made it a key priority to have youth voices heard during the Forum, which is why young people representing different regions featured prominently throughout the three days on the main stage and in various partner sessions.

Meanwhile, a dedicated SDG7 Youth Hub bustled with energy, as youth hosted their own sessions on topics such as securing finance for youth-run businesses, cross-continental cooperation for SDG7, career speed networking, and more.

At the opening plenary on Day 1 Secretary John Kerry, U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, and Fatoumata Diarrassouba, Co-Founder of Afrik’Energy Connect, talked about how youth can engage politically around energy and climate issues.

The “We the Inheritors” session also saw the new generation of global energy champions in dialogue with senior leaders, including Mary Robinson, Honorary President of the Africa-Europe Foundation, and former President of Ireland, and Cristina Duarte, Under-Secretary-General and Special Adviser on Africa to the United Nations Secretary-General.

The impressive youth participation at the Forum was made possible thanks to sponsorship for youth delegations provided by Africa Europe Foundation, UNDP, the Government of Iceland, EU Commission, AES Corporation, Pan African Climate Justice Alliance and WRI.

The power of partnership

collaboration

Above all, the Forum highlighted that progress on energy, climate and development goals will only happen if we work together.

“It is really encouraging to see so many people here who truly care about Sustainable Development Goal 7 and want to work together because they know we have to collaborate if we want to succeed,” said Damilola Ogunbiyi, CEO and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All and Co-Chair of UN-Energy.

The opportunity to connect with old and new partners alike is what drove hundreds of attendees to come to Kigali and to participate online, with many of them taking advantage of the GET.invest Matchmaking platform to connect with potential business partners, public and private investors, and policymakers through selected personal meetings.

The connections made and conversations had during the Forum are the seeds for further collaboration that can bring us closer to the goal of clean, affordable energy for all and net-zero.

Of course, SEforALL could not have produced such a successful Forum without the generous support of our many partners, particularly our co-host, the Government of Rwanda.

We want to thank SEforALL’s funders and our many Forum sponsors who made this event possible:  All On, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Global Energy Alliance for People and Planet, OPEC Fund, The Rockefeller Foundation, AECF, Energy Catalyst, Clean Cooking Alliance, Ecobank, Enel Green Power, World Bank ESMAP, the European Union, Google, GWEC, Modern Energy Cooking Services, Power Africa, the AES Corporation, ClimateWorks Foundation, IKEA Foundation, Infracredit, International Copper Association, and the Islamic Development Bank.

Country

Rwanda

SEforALL Forum Closes with Over USD 347 Million in New Commitments Made to Energy Access and Transition

News

Several new initiatives and partnerships also announced at landmark global gathering for sustainable energy

Yesterday, 19 May, the Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) Forum, co-hosted by the Government of Rwanda, closed after three days of programming focused on advancing a clean and inclusive energy transition around the world.

Over 1,000 attendees, including leaders from government, business, development institutions, and civil society, gathered to enable commitments and partnerships for energy, climate and development progress.

The Forum included the announcement of several new commitments and initiatives to support energy access and transition, with approximately USD 347 million in finance commitments revealed by SEforALL’s partners.

“While we celebrate the success of this global SEforALL Forum, we also recognize that there is still a long way for us to go. We need urgent and decisive action to drive forward a people-centred energy transition,” said Damilola Ogunbiyi, CEO and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All and Co-Chair of UN-Energy, in closing out the Forum. “Energy, climate and development must go together – clean energy access truly is the link to a better life, to a safer and more prosperous future.”

The financial commitments announced at the Forum included:

  • Bloomberg Philanthropies committed USD 242 million to accelerate the clean energy transition in 10 developing countries, including Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, and South Africa, through partnerships with SEforALL, the ClimateWorks Foundation, and other key partners to expand renewable energy capacity and access while phasing out coal use.
     
  • Global Energy Alliance for People and Planet (GEAPP) committed USD 50 million to further its multi-year support for SEforALL to bridge energy access gaps and support energy transition programmes in targeted markets.
     
  • IKEA Foundation announced USD 5.8 million in funding for the Universal Energy Facility, the results-based financing facility managed by SEforALL.
     
  • Innovate UK’s Energy Catalyst announced that up to GBP 40 million will be issued to help combat the climate crisis for communities in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Indo-Pacific regions.

New initiatives and partnerships launched at the Forum included:

  • Ministers from African countries participated in a private Ministerial roundtable to help build a narrative for what constitutes a just and equitable energy transition in Africa, and to help guide commitments and actions on energy access and transition on the road to COP27. A communique from the represented countries was issued. Meanwhile, an Asia-Pacific Ministerial roundtable focused on scaling-up finance for the energy transition.
     
  • New and updated Energy Compacts were submitted to UN-Energy from Nepal and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), along with strong calls for accelerated action from Malawi, Nigeria and the UN for others to join existing or new Compacts.
     
  • Mission Efficiency was unveiled as a collective of commitments and actions on energy efficiency made by governments, organizations and other initiatives.
     
  • Climate and impact fund manager Camco Clean Energy has partnered with Energy Peace Partners to manage the Peace Renewable Energy Credit (P-REC) Aggregation Fund to expand renewable energy investment in fragile states in Sub-Saharan Africa.
     
  • OPEC Fund announced an Energy Access and Transition Trust Fund to support clean cooking solutions and to facilitate a model project in Madagascar.
     
  • The Scottish Government launched its new Global Renewables Centre, which will provide a hub for facilitating knowledge exchange between the Scottish Renewable Sector and the Scottish Government’s three African partner countries – Malawi, Rwanda and Zambia.
     
  • Solar Sister, Inc. and LivelyHoods Kenya announced their merger to bring economic opportunity and clean energy to millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Forum also marked the 10th anniversary of SEforALL as an organization and provided an opportunity to reflect on its progress and establish goals for the next 10 years.

Country

Rwanda

SEforALL Forum Kicks Off with Rwandan President Kagame and Global Leaders to Advance the Energy Transition

News

On opening day, President Kagame addresses more than 1,000 attendees, followed by major clean energy investment announcements

Today, May 17, prominent global leaders from government, business, development institutions, civil society, and more convened at the Kigali Convention Centre for the opening day of the 2022 SEforALL Forum, the landmark international gathering on sustainable energy. The Forum is a moment for enabling commitments and partnerships for energy, climate and development progress.

The Forum opened with remarks from Rwandan President Paul Kagame where he stated:

“Over the past decade, significant progress has been achieved toward the 7th Sustainable Development Goal on affordable and clean energy for all…This energy crisis coincides with the threat of climate change, to which our continent is especially vulnerable. Switching to renewable energy is crucial. That is why creating an enabling environment to attract investment in sustainable energy is so important.

“There needs to be increased financing to developing countries to support climate adaptation, in line with international agreements. Africa cannot carry the burden alone, especially given that its emissions did not create the climate emergency. However, Africa will be part of the solution.”

President Kagame’s full remarks are available here. Forum attendees were also welcomed with remarks from António Guterres, UN Secretary-General; Damilola Ogunbiyi, CEO and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All and Co-Chair of UN-Energy; Hon. Ernest Nsabimana, Rwanda Minister of Infrastructure; and Michael R. Bloomberg, UN Special Envoy for Climate Ambition and Solutions Founder, Bloomberg LP & Bloomberg Philanthropies, among others.

Damilola Ogunbiyi said, “Through the Forum, SEforALL, with all of you here today, aims to shape what a just and equitable energy transition would look like across economies at distinct stages of development. We recognize that low-emitting, energy-poor countries must provide for the growth, development, and aspirations of their populations while also achieving their net-zero targets. Countries in Africa and Asia have unique challenges that must be considered and addressed to get them from where they are today to a clean energy future that leaves no one behind.”

Damilola plenary

The Forum also seeks to spur investments in universal energy access, efficiency and transition, and to inform and inspire participants into action. Along these lines, key moments and announcements emerging from Day 1 included:

  • Bloomberg Philanthropies committed USD 242 million to accelerate the clean energy transition in 10 developing countries. Making the announcement Michael R. Bloomberg said, “We’ve seen that it’s possible to increase access to affordable power, improve public health, and fight climate change all at the same time – and to make progress quickly in each area. We have to spread that success around the world, especially in developing countries that have contributed the least to the climate crisis but are facing the most severe effects. This support will help ten countries with enormous clean energy potential seize the opportunity and avoid building new coal plants.”
     
  • Ministers from African countries participated in a private Ministerial roundtable, with the aim of building a narrative for what constitutes a just and equitable energy transition in Africa, and to help guide commitments and actions on energy access and transition on the road to COP27. The outcomes of this Ministerial will be shared in the coming days.
     
  • SEforALL launched the Chilling Prospects research report that identified 1 in 7 people globally are at high risk due to lack of access to cooling and numbers will continue to rise by 2030 without action to achieve universal electrification and end extreme poverty.

Day 2 of the Forum, 18 May, will begin with a conversation about the importance of bold climate action in advance of COP27 moderated by Nigel Topping, UN High-Level Climate Action Champion for COP26; Dr. Sherien Fekry, Assistant Minister of Environment for Coordination and Implementation of Environmental Policies, Egypt; Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation; and Ghislain Irakoze, Rwanda PreCOP26 Youth Representative participating.

There will also be country-specific sessions mapping out the path for the clean energy transition in Rwanda, Nigeria, and India, as well as the announcement of new Energy Compact commitments and discussions on the importance of finance for the energy transition.

Full Forum programme here

Register to watch virtually here

Country

Rwanda

Chilling Prospects 2022: Unlocking financing for energy-efficient cooling in Rwanda

Data analysis
Chilling Prospects 2022

Reflections on five years of the Kigali Amendment by the Rwanda Cooling Initiative

See all Cooling for All partner stories

Explore the full report


In 2018, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) United for Efficiency (U4E) initiative, the Basel Agency for Sustainable Energy (BASE) and the Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) launched the Rwanda Cooling Initiative (R-COOL) with support from the Clean Cooling Collaborative (CCC). Its aim was to aid the country’s transition to efficient, climate-friendly cooling through a range of policy measures (including Africa’s most ambitious minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and labels based on U4E’s Model Regulation Guidelines).

The scope was expanded in early 2021 to include the development of a financing initiative (FI), which is expected to unlock at least USD 1 million in financing for 12,500 approved appliances by 2024. The initiative was informed by the ECOFRIDGES green-on wage financing (GO) approach which had been successfully initiated by the team in Ghana as the most appropriate approach for the Rwandan market, allowing public and private sector employees to use a low-interest bank loan to purchase qualifying appliances with repayments deducted from their salaries. Like ECOFRIDGES, R-COOL FI is comprehensive in addressing recycling and capacity building. 

Initial technical assistance by U4E and BASE entails integrated design and implementation with local partners from the public and private sector so that a smooth handover of responsibilities is orchestrated as early as practicable for a pathway toward self-sufficiency. The emphasis is on models that are replicable in Africa and beyond where rising incomes and electricity access are driving ever greater adoption of mechanical cooling. The initiative operates within the context of the challenges of local finance, including consumer loan interest rates that are often above 20 percent.  

The technical team worked with the Government of Rwanda to negotiate discounts on the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MRSP) of participating products to cover the cost of financing and offset the incentive for recycling old products. Such financial mechanisms can achieve a triple win: improve consumer access to high-quality equipment; safeguard the climate; and develop local financial intermediation services.  

A robust set of well-enforced criteria, with ongoing monitoring and oversight, and compelling marketing are key to keeping all parties aligned toward the success of the programme while maintaining healthy competition among participants. These criteria should: 

  • Enable grid-connected households and small enterprises (on-bill) and salaried employees (on-wage) to finance efficient refrigerators and air-conditioning systems that are otherwise likely more expensive to purchase than inefficient competing products. 

  • For officials, link with relevant development policy targets and agreements, MEPS and labels, and opportunities to address energy security and economic competitiveness considerations. 

  • Provide a common set of terms and conditions that are agreed upon by all participating parties, and monitor compliance to ensure a level playing field. 

  • Offer capacity building for participating vendors, banks, utilities, government agencies and waste management companies to ensure they understand their roles and responsibilities – start with a pilot phase to test readiness. 

  • Raise customer awareness through a dedicated marketing campaign. 

  • Allow time for importation of products that meet the eligibility criteria, making the case through the anticipated market demand potential. 

  • Ensure relationship building among participating actors to ensure smooth functioning, and exchanges of information (e.g., for applications). 

  • Include a mix of competing vendors and banks to allow for diversity of options but with a suitable pipeline of opportunity where all can benefit.
     

    Infographic: R-COOL GO mechanism
    The R-COOL GO mechanism

According to Chilling Prospects: Tracking Sustainable Cooling for All 2022 over 750 million Africans face cooling access challenges, and around half are on the brink of purchasing their first air conditioner or refrigerator. Even though a high-efficiency appliance typically costs consumers much less over its lifetime (due to reduced energy consumption), than an inefficient one, the higher upfront cost is a significant barrier for them. Moreover, they have no incentive to consider which refrigerant is utilized, so inefficient products utilizing high-GWP refrigerants remain predominant.

Picture: Launch of the Rwanda Cooling Initiative's Green On-Wage (R-COOL GO) financing mechanism
Launch of the Rwanda Cooling Initiative's Green On-Wage (R-COOL GO) financing mechanism in January 2022

The R-COOL GO finance mechanism fixed a set of objectives and goals for newly certified sold appliances, unlocked finance, saved greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and saved energy.

R-COOL GO from 2022 to 2025 (cumulative)

Chilling Prospects

Chilling Prospects 2022

Cooling for All partner stories

Country

Rwanda

Programme

Cooling for All